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Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies

Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies

Love knows no religion.Feb. 13, 2008213 Min.
Your rating: 0
9 1 vote

Synopsis

Watch: जोधा अकबर 2008 123movies, Full Movie Online – Jodhaa Akbar is a sixteenth century love story about a marriage of alliance that gave birth to true love between a great Mughal Emperor, Akbar and a Rajput princess, Jodhaa. Politically, success knew no bounds for Emperor Akbar, After having secured the Hindu Kush, he furthered his realm by conquest until his empire extended from Afghanistan to the Bay of Bengal, and from the Himalayas to the Godhavari River. Through a shrewd blend of tolerance, generosity and force, Akbar won the allegiance of the Rajputs, the most belligerent Hindus. But little did Akbar know that when he married Jodhaa, a fiery Rajput princess, in order to further strengthen his relations with the Rajputs, he would in turn be embarking upon a new journey – the journey of true love. The daughter of King Bharmal of Amer, Jodhaa resented being reduced to a mere political pawn in this marriage of alliance, and Akbar’s biggest challenge now did not merely lie in winning battles, but in winning the love of Jodhaa – a love hidden deep below resentment and extreme prejudice. Jodhaa Akbar is their untold love story..
Plot: A sixteenth century love story about a marriage of alliance that gave birth to true love between a Mughal emperor and a Rajput princess.
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Ratings:

7.5/10 Votes: 32,974
75% | RottenTomatoes
69/100 | MetaCritic
N/A Votes: 206 Popularity: 11.472 | TMDB

Reviews:

“Jodhaa Akbar” : Paro Grows Up, But She’s Still A Little Girl (Oh, and Thank Goodness for Subtitles)
Ashutosh Gowariker’s “Jodhaa Akbar” is the most ambitious film to emerge from Bollywood’s stables in quite a while. Based on the historical alliance between India’s greatest Mughal emperor and a Rajput Hindu princess, Gowariker models his film on the Shakespearean mould of palace intrigue with its collection of warring power brokers, plotting princes, distant queen mothers, bitchy but loyal eunuchs, and concubines galore. It’s also something of a gamble: Gowariker has never treaded the historical epic in his earlier features, especially one about India’s first attempt at religious pluralism. The results are mixed but laudable, largely because the script adheres to the golden rule about bringing historical episodes to film: know the history, but print the legend.

Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Pocahontas were all real people whose life stories have been told and retold in popular Hollywood films, each retelling adding and embellishing elements of the story which have helped the stories attain the status of pseudoreligious myth. India certainly has a rich history of quasi-historical legends: Anarkali, Heer-Ranjha, Umrao Jaan, Devdas, and now Jodhaa-Akbar.

Let there be no doubt: this is not a documentary nor do the filmmakers make any overt attempt at a documentary characterization of Akbar. History tells us that he was a unique and even megalomaniacal emperor: he had many wives and untold numbers of concubines in a harem which (depending on which account you believe) included a few male lovers, invented his own religion in which he was divine, and held court with atheists, Jews, and Jesuits, a practice which would become decidedly less common with future emperors.

Hrithik Roshan puts up what is probably his best performance as Akbar, though he is hindered by the sheer volume of activity making up the plot: an absent queen mother, sinister foster mother, devious brothers, and, above all, a reluctant wife, all demand his attention. Roshan is at his best when Akbar is wooing a banished Jodhaa and when he ventures off into his kingdom; in many ways, Akbar remains a symbol of tolerance and benign authoritarianism throughout—despite the fact that he is the one who sets much of the narrative’s action into play, surprisingly few scenes give us insight into his inner workings; the opposite is true for Jodhaa.

In the last decade since Aishwariya Rai was introduced to movie-going audiences, she has grown tremendously as an actress. “Jodhaa Akbar” is not her best work, but it offers ample evidence of her growth along the spectrum of Paro-type roles she has enacted since Bhansalli’s “Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam” : Nandini of “HDDCS,” Paro of “Devdas,” the eponymous Umrao Jaan, and now Jodhaa are essentially different interpretations of the same feminine archetype: a Lady Beloved of the Legends, who, having been robbed of all agency because of her gender, comes to embody beauty, suffering, fidelity, and, of course, love.

Nandini was a flighty romantic, Umrao Jaan a forlorn romantic, and Paro a languishing fool who settled for survival when love literally slashed her away. Jodhaa is decidedly not romantic, being that she is an emblem of her family’s honor. She is given away as a peace offering to an emperor who demands alliance and submission only to find that he wants to become her ally in love.

Rai plays Jodhaa as a torn victim, but she is not without her own inner steel: she sets her own conditions for marriage, challenges palace customs, and steps on more than few royal toes along the way, notably those of the unforgiving Maham Anga. She’s not as wishy-washy as Paro or as flirty as Nandini, but she is undoubtedly cut from the same cloth. And speaking of cutting, she’s first rate in the five-minute sword fight between Jodhaa and Akbar, a scene which goes from swordplay to foreplay.

Rai is slated to play Anarkali opposite Ben Kingsley’s Shah Jahan in an upcoming film and has yet another role as the pining courtesan in Bhansalli’s next, “Bajirao Mastani.” Normally, I would accuse her of self-typecasting, but it seems that filmmakers themselves are unwilling or unable to see her differently. Jag Mundhara did with “Provoked,” extracting an emotionally naked performance from her which is without question her finest work to date. Will others be as daring to cast her in similar light? Probably not.

The film works best when the narrative focuses on the interaction between its two leads who are more similar than they perhaps ought to be: both are icons of physical beauty, sexuality, and glamour, but thankfully this has been tampered down by Gowariker’s interpretation of the characters. True, Akbar probably didn’t have Roshan’s sinewy physique, and Jodhaa (whose existence continues to be challenged in certain historical readings) probably couldn’t write in Arabic and likely never set foot in a kitchen. But such considerations are immaterial when you’re telling a love story.

The other striking thing about the film is that for non-native Hindi and Urdu speakers, the dialogue is virtually incomprehensible without the subtitles. The old fashioned Urdu recitations are especially difficult to ascertain, though sometimes the subtitles only further your confusion. One line in “In Lamhon Ke Daman Mein” which is literally translated as “Beauty is imbibed in cherished blandishments.” What???

Gowariker makes a valiant attempt at a film that is war epic, love story, and costume drama all in one, but never does “Jodhaa Akbar” approach the charm or finesse of “Lagaan.” The main flaw with the film is that it is overly ambitious: Akbar may have been a polymath, but there’s no way a single film could encompass all of his endeavors. Gowariker’s script strays into too many quarters looking for the historical Akbar and ends up offering what is an unfortunately shallow characterization. Jodhaa, conversely, has less to occupy her and is more clearly defined.

And so in the end it turns out that “Akbar the Great” is, in celluloid terms at least, “Akbar the Pretty Good.”

Review By: akbarnali
What Can Be Said? Except Excellent
Swades was released in December 2004 and since then, this project was said to be considered by the director, Ashutosh Gowariker. The director of movies such as “Laagan” and “Swades,” has once again left no stones unturned and proved that he is also capable of directing a movie related the colossal personality – Akbar the Great, also known as “Jalaludin Mohammed Akbar.” A young Akbar, sets out to conquer Kingdoms and those who don’t join him, are brutally executed but after a while he begins to pardon them and that’s when many of his opponents begin to realise that they had and have, misunderstood him. One particular Rajput Raja Bharmal, instead of facing the Moghul’s mighty army, decides that it would be better that his daughter, Raj Kumari Jodhaa Bai, who is be throned to another Rajput Prince, marries Akbar. The couple do unite in marriage but only after Akbar agrees to the two conditions which the Rajput Princess has put forward. At the same time, he has to win her heart as well as to look after the interest of his public.

Jodhaa Akbar, which stars Hrithik Roshan, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Khulbhushan Kharbanda, Suhasini Mulay, Digvijay Purchit and Punam S. Sinha, is a romantic, biographical and historical movie, which is set in a era of revolt, conspiracies and war. It also deals with intercaste marriage, which at the time was not heard off due to the fact that when the Mughals invaded India, the Rajput Princesses and Queens became Sati when their husbands, the Kings were killed in battle so as not to be captured and, or, forced to live with the Invaders.

Hrithik Roshan, son of the director and producer, Rakesh Roshan and nephew of the music director Rajesh Roshan, was offered this role as the director, Ashutosh Gowariker, who had seen him in “Koi Mil Gaya.” believed that he was capable of doing justice to this part and also because of his physique. His natural choice for the lead of “Jodhaa Bai” was Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, not only just because of her beauty but talent as well. He has proved to be correct with the cast – brilliant as they have done justice to their respective parts.

This is a well written story by Haider Ali, and co written, directed and produced by Ashutosh Gowariker, which has gone into great details with research and choosing sites for filming. The cinematography, by Kiran Deohams, is excellent and some cases breath taking. The music, by A.R. Rehman, is pleasant and suits the genre movie and the songs, though a few, are good as well and especially the wedding night song. The costumes and jewellery, which I am sure that a lot of the members of the audience, will be looking out for, designed by the famous Neeta Lulla, is elegant. The stunts and the fight sequences, which are well timed, and though they look dangerous at times, are worthwhile watching. In one scene, where Akbar is seen fighting an elephant, actor Hrithik Roshan did get injured but continued with the filming. His injuries were related to those of when he was filming for “Krissh.” But really pushes the fight and stunt sequences, is the special effects by Pankaj Khandpur, which are worth to watch.

Conclusion: This movie has all the ingredients to become a classic, epic movie in the future, even though it is three and a half hours in duration. It is worth it.

For those interested in a bit of gossip. Hrithik Roshan, who has been offered to work in some Hollywood movies, may not have to go over to in at least one of them. The reason being is that actress Penelope Cruz, may be working with him in a yet untitled Bollywood movie, which is said to be directed by his father, Rakesh Roshan. Could it be that this is just the beginning of a merger between Hollywood and Bollywood? I wonder! Elsewhere, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, is soon to be working in a movie with the “Mahatama,” Ben Kingsley, with whom she has worked with before, in an English version of “Taj Mahal.” It seems like that she can’t keep away from the family.

Review By: Pratik112

Other Information:

Original Title जोधा अकबर
Release Date 2008-02-13
Release Year 2008

Original Language hi
Runtime 3 hr 33 min (213 min), 2 hr 3 min (123 min) (Version on some DVDs/Blu-Rays)
Budget 5800000
Revenue 28700000
Status Released
Rated Not Rated
Genre Action, Drama, History
Director Ashutosh Gowariker
Writer Haidar Ali, Ashutosh Gowariker, K.P. Saxena
Actors Hrithik Roshan, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Sonu Sood
Country India
Awards 38 wins & 33 nominations
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix DTS, Dolby Digital
Aspect Ratio 2.35 : 1
Camera Arriflex 435, Zeiss and Angenieux Lenses, Arriflex 535, Zeiss and Angenieux Lenses
Laboratory N/A
Film Length 5,824.9 m
Negative Format 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 100T 5212, Vision2 200T 5217, Vision2 500T 5218)
Cinematographic Process Digital Intermediate (master format), Super 35 (source format)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic)

Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies
Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies
Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies
Jodhaa Akbar 2008 123movies
Original title जोधा अकबर
TMDb Rating 7.381 206 votes

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