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Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies

Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies

Controversy...What Controversy?Jun. 25, 2004123 Min.
Your rating: 0
9 1 vote

Synopsis

Watch: Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies, Full Movie Online – Following up on ‘Bowling for Columbine’, film-maker Michael Moore provides deep and though-provoking insights on the American security system, the level of paranoia, fear, uncertainty, false values and patriotism, which all combined together to set a stage for George W. Bush to launch a war on Iraq instead of focusing on getting the real culprit(s) behind the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This documentary also focuses on how some Saudis were safely and secretly flown out of America while planes were ostensibly grounded after the attacks. Archived film footage, candid interviews with politicians, and an overall waste of public funds for a war that was initiated on false pretension to wit: a weapon of mass distraction – to take the focus away from the real enemy and get Americans glued to their TV sets to watch innocent Iraqis and Afghans getting killed. And a war that would eventually alienate the U.S.A. and its citizens from almost every country on Earth..
Plot: Michael Moore’s view on how the Bush administration allegedly used the tragic events on 9/11 to push forward its agenda for unjust wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Smart Tags: #cover_up #cult_film #expose #imperialism #american_history #human_rights #post_september_11_2001 #anti_war #independent_film #propaganda #american_imperialism #kakistocracy #jarhead #superpower #self_righteousness #dark_comedy #2000_u.s._presidential_election #politics_documentary #military_and_war_documentary #cigarette_smoking #cigarette


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Ratings:

7.5/10 Votes: 129,989
82% | RottenTomatoes
67/100 | MetaCritic
N/A Votes: 1196 Popularity: 11.579 | TMDB

Reviews:

A whirlwind tour of corruption and diplomatic deceit
“Fahrenheit 9/11” is an important film, dealing in detail with the great issues of current American society, with a degree of skepticism that our newsmedia has proven entirely incapable of exhibiting in the last decade. Lone gadfly Michael Moore cannot singlehandedly reverse the effects of a servile corporate media, but he can — and does — fling it right back in their faces. Is it any wonder televised interviews with Moore have been less-than-cordial of late?

It doesn’t matter. For a film like this, any publicity is beneficial, and Michael Moore has gone out of his way to thank his conservative detractors for their support.

As a movie, it’s a whirlwind tour of corruption and diplomatic deceit at the highest levels of the industrial-political machine, mixed with direct examination of the lives of the “ordinary” people affected by the decisions of the aristocratic few. Much like a roller-coaster ride, it pulls you up the first steep incline with images of the 2000 presidential election followed by the major players in the bush administration getting ready for their performances, and then comes the first plunge: a stomach-wrenching drop into the black screen, with only the sounds of that awful day in September when “everything changed”. Fade back in on the people of New York, confused, hurting, seeking their loved ones in the rubble.

From here on, there is no stopping for breath. We observe the flight of Saudi aristocrats who, but for their political connections, might have been held as material witnesses. Moore depicts vividly the links between the Bush family and their Saudi friends, one of whom (Prince Bandar) “earns” the Bush surname. On it goes, fact after fact after irrefutable and disgusting fact. Many of us entered the theatre thinking we knew the score, but seldom has an overview of each tree led to such a complete vision of the forest.

Along the way, we’ll see behavior from members of the bush administration that cannot be described as flattering — but once again, this isn’t up for debate. It’s the facts, it’s what they themselves said. You can argue context, but the footage speaks for itself. And more than anything else, this is where Michael Moore proves he’s grown as a director. No longer are his films chock-full of his narrative, he lets the evildoers hoist themselves on their own petards without as much overdubbed commentary. His statement rests in the overall structure of the film, rather than his usual assortment of shame-defying pecadillos and exposes.

Which is not to say that fans of his spirited antics won’t have something to watch, as he drives around the capital building in an ice cream truck reading the Patriot act to the representatives who never bothered to read the legislation they passed, or chases after congressmen trying to get them interested in enlisting their children for a tour of duty in Iraq.

Aaah, Iraq. The second half of the film deals with the buildup to and execution of our current adventure in nation building. Iraq is shown with a brief clip from before and a whole lot of after — with its people confused, hurting, seeking their loved ones in the rubble. Our soldiers are also given plenty of time on-screen, time to describe what it’s like, time to proclaim the thrills, dangers, and ennui of life as an occupying army. Far from being unsupportive as claimed by its detractors, this film makes every effort to give the front-liners their say. Wounded soldiers are treated with no less compassion than the other victims in this film. And unlike the corporate newsmedia, Moore’s cameras dare to follow the injured to the Walter Reed medical center and into their underfunded rehabilitation.

And it follows the heart of a patriotic woman from Moore’s hometown of Flint whose soldier son makes the ultimate sacrifice for Bush’s folly.

This is, above all, a sympathetic, patriotic and humanistic movie. Even its main star, George W. Bush, is given a measure of understanding. We understand that he is out of his league, unable to push for the appropriate diplomatic solutions with Saudi Arabia, forever beholden to the corporate interests that purchased his throne, barely capable of coherent thought, and not at all comfortable with the responsibilities of the presidency. He would far rather be golfing, or “lookin’ for bugs”, or hanging at fundraisers with “the haves and the have-mores”; the presidency is a burden he clearly cannot bear. He almost begs to be removed from office.

This movie has a lot more to say than any reviewer’s encapsulation can convey. Ignore the naysayers who, in all likelihood, haven’t even seen the film. Understand that the facts are the facts, the presentation is Mr. Moore’s, and your opinion is your own.

My opinion: 10/10 — If there’s a documentary/editorial piece that could touch this one, I haven’t seen it yet.

Review By: 0rganism
“I’m a War President.”
To be fair, I should qualify this review by saying that I’m progressive, a political science professor, anti-war, and a Bush opponent. So I was hardly watching this film with an objective eye.

That being said (and if you can still trust my review), Michael Moore has done American voters a big service by making this film. It’s not without it weaknesses, namely the voice-overs where Moore speculates on Bush’s thoughts during those endless blank stares. But for once, Moore has made a film that is woven together with a chronological and thematic logic that ultimately asks one critical question: Is it that the Powers that Be don’t understand, or that they simply don’t believe in, true democratic principles? While George W. Bush is the primary subject of the film’s critiques, the Democrats are not left unscathed. In fact, the first 10 minutes are devoted to a skewering of the Democratically-controlled Senate (including, ironically, former V. P., Senate President, and Presidential contender Al Gore.) Moore’s commentary here, as with his past films, revolves around the relationship between money and power, and how that connection degrades democracy and in its most insidious form, leads to the loss of innocent lives. While he holds the Bush family and key administration officials most directly accountable, Moore does not let anyone off the hook. This includes not just the usual suspects (Saudi Arabia), but the Democratic leadership, the Supreme Court, the media, and finally, the American voters. Nothing here is new to anyone who has spent any time perusing the alternative or progressive media in the past four years, but the effect is substantial because Moore has finally shown himself to be a true documentarian, and has woven together a coherent picture of the connections between the players and the events from December 2000 to the present. Setting aside the few moments of Moore’s own commentary and some silly interjections of old westerns, the message ultimately relies on the presentation of documents, images, and interviews. The facts are so tight that the worst anyone can say about the veracity of the film is that it is biased, a critique that will carry far less weight when compared to the snippets of Fox news propaganda spliced into the movie.

Moore will be called anti-American, unpatriotic, and probably a fascist. This, of course, is the last resort of a regime and its supporters who have no credible challenge to the facts of the film, only to its message. Ultimately, all audiences, regardless of their political proclivities, should be able to see that Moore is anything but anti-American or anti-democratic. The single biggest piece of the film is devoted to following around the mother of a soldier killed in Iraq. She is a patriot and a “true American”, by any definition. Her son, and the thousands like him, are honored by Moore. They are portrayed as heroes, but also as victims. They are protectors of American security, but also pawns in a global struggle for power.

By finally asking the right questions (4 years too late??), Moore has shown himself to be not just a solid filmmaker, but a patriot and a defender of the most sacred American liberty- free expression.

Review By: princesss_buttercup3

Other Information:

Original Title Fahrenheit 9/11
Release Date 2004-06-25
Release Year 2004

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 2 min (122 min)
Budget 6000000
Revenue 222446882
Status Released
Rated R
Genre Documentary, Drama, War
Director Michael Moore
Writer Michael Moore
Actors Michael Moore, George W. Bush, Ben Affleck
Country United States
Awards 29 wins & 17 nominations
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Dolby Digital, DTS
Aspect Ratio 1.85 : 1
Camera Sony HDC-F950
Laboratory Technicolor
Film Length N/A
Negative Format Video (HDTV), Video (NTSC) (archive footage)
Cinematographic Process HDTV (1080p/24)
Printed Film Format 35 mm

Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Fahrenheit 9/11 2004 123movies
Original title Fahrenheit 9/11
TMDb Rating 7.1 1,196 votes

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